Leigh Hall Leigh Hall

 

Names of famous men of science and fanciful alchemical figures embellish the fašade of the Chemistry and Pharmacy Building, designed by Rudolph Weaver in 1927. Even the copper downspouts are embossed with chemical symbols. It was renamed for the first Chairman of the Chemistry Department, Townes R. Leigh. Square towers distinguish the North elevation and a two story oriel bay window faces the Plaza of the Americas. In 1948, Guy Fulton extended the building with a western wing, in modified Collegiate Gothic.


Character Defining Features

 

  • SCALE camera
  •           3-1/2 stories

  • MASSING camera
  •           Rectangular "E" shape plan evolved over time

              Projecting angled bays

  • ROOF
  •           Gable and cross gables

              Parapets with stone copings

              Dormers with shed roof

  • ENTRANCES camera
  •           Near ends of the long sides/p>

  • WINDOWS camera
  •           6 over 6 lights

              Double hung with 1 to 3 light transoms

              Groupings of three, four and singles

  • MATERIALS camera
  •           Brick is English bond

              Flat red clay tile

  • ORNAMENTATION camera
  •           Cast stone water table, corner stone and quoins

              Decorative lintels and sills

              Cast stone entrance surrounds and angled bay surrounds

              Cast stone gargoyles in the cornice

  • INTERIOR FEATURES
  • BUILDING-SITE RELATIONSHIP

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    Leigh Hall

     


    Architect:  Rudolph Weaver, 1927 and Guy Fulton, 1948 addition

    Contractor:  J. L. Crouse Company

    Building Name:  Townes R. Leigh, Chairman of Chemistry Department and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences from 1933-1948


     

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